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Population Shock event
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Dr Abul Rizvi on Population Shock at The Chifley Centre (online)

Join us on 16 February with leading population and immigration policy expert Dr Abul Rizvi. Dr Rizvi joins us to discuss his recent book Population Shock and what needs to be done about population policy to secure our economic future at 6.00pm (AEDST) – thanks to the generous support of leading strategic communications firm Michelson Alexander.

You can register to attend here.

 

Michael Mintrom
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Enhancing the protection of human rights in Australia: Michael Mintrom, Paula Gerber in conversation with Paul Barclay

Join Prof Paula Gerber and Prof Michael Mintrom in a conversation with ABC Radio presenter Paul Barclay about human rights in Australia.

Australia is a sports obsessed nation, and our sporting culture thrives because we have rules that all players and spectators understand and generally abide by. Similarly, society has rules that facilitate harmonious living, and those rules are called human rights. Yet, unlike sports, the rules governing our society are often not understood, ignored or breached.

Paul Barclay, host of ABC Radio National’s Big Ideas program will facilitate a conversation with Paula Gerber, Professor of Human Rights Law at Monash University and Michael Mintrom, Professor of Public Policy at Monash University, where they will discuss the lack of human rights protections in Australia, the many and varied human rights breaches being perpetrated on a daily basis, and why it is vital that human rights are embedded in our schools, governments, institutions and every aspect of society.

Come and be a part of the live audience for the recording of this show which will be aired on Big Ideas on ABC Radio National.

Michael’s new book Advancing Human Rights, published as part of Monash’s In the National Interest series, argues that the advancement of human rights is an investment that creates ongoing benefits for the whole of society. He uses the lens of human rights to analyse disparate issues, such as, the quality of care in nursing homes, the treatment of illegal immigrants and police practices towards Indigenous people in custody.

Paula Gerber is the editor of two recently published multi-volume collections. The three-volume collection Worldwide Perspectives on Lesbians, Gays and Bisexuals is a rich interdisciplinary resource that makes a vital contribution to understanding how the rights of LGBTIQ+ people are progressing – and in some cases, regressing – around the globe. The 63 chapters look at the lived experiences of LGB people from varied perspectives and provides comprehensive coverage on a wide variety of topics ranging from LGB youth and LGB aging to the treatment of LGBTIQ+ people by different religions, including Islam, Judaism, and Christianity. It also explores the situation for LGBTIQ+ people in different countries, including, Australia, Samoa, Singapore, China and Russia.

Paula Gerber’s second edited collection is the two-volume Critical Perspectives on Human Rights Law in Australia. It consists of 46 chapters that not only analyse the many ways in which Australia is failing to protect human rights, particularly those of Indigenous Australians, LGBTIQ+ people, people with disabilities and other vulnerable minorities, but also what steps we can take to remedy this failing.

Policy Drift
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Policy Drift: John Daley and Martin Parkinson (Adelaide Festival)

As our Foreign Minister from 1988 – 1996 and President of the Brusselsbased International Crisis Group thereafter, After consistent reform at a Federal level across the Hawke, Keating, Howard and Gillard Governments, policy ambition seems to have stalled. In his book A Decade of
Drift, Martin Parkinson recounts serving six prime ministers as an integral part of key policy development at the highest levels. As CEO of the Grattan Institute for eleven years, John Daley has published widely across key policy areas, his writings underpinned by themes of prioritising government initiatives and the limits to government effectiveness. They argue Australia should demand more courage and commitment from their political leaders.